REVIEWS

Cold Mountain, The Santa Fe Opera

Emily Fons, also a mezzo soprano, brought rich tone to the role of Ruby, conveying rough-hewn lustiness. – James Keller, The Santa Fe New Mexican Emily Fons, singing with ringing, resonant tone, is delightful as the take-charge, mountain girl, Ruby, who comes to help Ada run her farm. – Mary Helen Klare, The Albuquerque Journal Mezzo Emily…

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Theater Jones

“Mezzo soprano Emily Fons has a dynamite voice: dark and rich yet flexible, and that dark sound is gloriously natural, not manufactured as we sometimes hear. She is universally praised for her androgynous portrayal of young men in many pants roles, such as Nicklausse in Offenbach’s Tales of Hoffmann.” – Theater Jones

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Opera News

“Her interpretation of Marguerite’s lovesick suitor Siébel was anything but reserved — rather raw and exceedingly physical. Fons’ rendition of “Faites-lui mes aveux” revealed a voice that ascended the scale easily, both agile and expressive.” – Opera News

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Arts ATL

“Mezzo-soprano Emily Fons was most impressive in the trouser role of Siébel, with the kind of light, fleet voice perfect for this role.” – James Paulk, ArtsATL.com

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Cleveland.com

“All the score’s key virtues – color, humor, character – were as evident as can be, and one couldn’t have asked for a fuller, sultrier mezzo-soprano than Emily Fons.” – Zachary Lewis

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Opera Britannia

“Young American soloist Emily Fons was almost beyond praise in the title role. Her powerful mezzo allied with solid technique produced fireworks in almost every aria, with stunning virtuosic cadenzas. Pretty singing and affecting feeling in “Si, tornerò” contrasted with gripping force in “Sebben mi lusinga” with her voice moving up a gear in the da capo, an…

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The Opera Critic

“Emily Fons is excellent as Faramondo – clearly a young man staking out his own territory against Gustavo. In the aria ‘Voglio che sia l’indegno’, a raised eyebrow – as it were an inverse wink – makes the audience complicit in his sentiments. Her voice has a young man’s lightness, while still conveying the intensity…

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Financial Times

“The gifted young mezzo-soprano Emily Fons extracts all its poignancy and demonstrates ample vocal muscle in Faramondo’s more heroic utterances.” – George Loomis, Financial Times

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NewOutpost.com

“Further reinforcement came from the ideal Siebel of mezzo-soprano Emily Fons, whose smooth lyric voice poured forth with well-oiled facility during her big number “Faites-lui mes aveux”. Her declamation was consistently well produced and alert. She also brought an ideal blend of proclivities to her assignment: tall, trim, and projective of a natural boyish charm…

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Chicago Classical Review

“As Prince Orlovsky, former Ryan Center member Emily Fons added another trousers role to her growing repertorial wardrobe. Unsmiling and convincingly androgynous, the mezzo sang with warm tone and etched a superb characterization of the wealthy and eternally bored young Russian royal.” – Chicago Classical Review

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Seen and Heard International

“Emily Fons made the character of Count Orlofsky a pivotal part of the evening, with her rich mezzo fitting the role well. The sincere tone she set with the number “Brüderlein und Schwesterlein” carried through to the other soloists and the chorus.” – Seen and Heard International

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The Santa Fe Reporter

“Emily Fons as Cherubino deserves special mention. She’s had illustrious predecessors here in the role, Helen Vanni, Frederica von Stade and Isabel Leonard among them. But fret not. Fons is up there with the best in terms of flexibility, phrasing, vivacity. “Voi che sapete” nearly steals the Countess’ heart, and it easily steals ours in…

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