Portrayed by…Emily Fons, Cherubino most unselfconsciously embodied the lusty spirit of this production. Fons effortlessly captured the charm, confusion, resourcefulness and raging hormones of adolescence, and her Act I aria, “Non so piu cosa son,” and her Act II canzona, “Voi che sapete,” were sung with such innocence, such lyrical purity, that they were among…

Read More

At the heart of this story is, of course, Sister Helen Prejean. Emily Fons makes her Kentucky Opera debut in this role, bringing Prejean’s humor, outspokenness and deep faith to light. Fons’ warm voice foregrounds Prejean’s compassion, while still showing the doubts she has about undertaking this journey and, ultimately, the strength of her convictions…

Read More

Mezzo-soprano Emily Fons created a fiery, deeply human Donna Elvira, blending a dark, warm, mezzo sound, with vocal agility and an easy command of the role’s soprano range. Elaine Schmidt for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Read More

The standout of the cast was a Woody Guthrie-inspired Cherubino in jeans, cowboy hat, and carrying a guitar, performed outstandingly by Emily Fons. The classic pants role was convincingly acted. Her boyish tosses of the arm and a gawky posture simply made the audience forget they were looking at a woman until she opened her…

Read More

The equal of Majeski’s Fiordiligi was Emily Fons’s Dorabella. Fons’s rich voice, elegant line, and playful manner left one longing for more. The duets between the sisters were transcendent: Majeski and Fons sang with such consonance of breath, dynamic, phrasing, and emotion it was as if they were one voice singing in perfect harmony with…

Read More